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Thread: Out with the old | In with the new

  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

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    2016 Update...the engine is mounted! Thanks to Nathan at Thomas Vintage Motors for his fantastic fabrication skills. I need to learn to weld. The mounts still need a little cleanup work (round the edges of the plates and paint), but they are functional. It turned out to be relatively easy. The plates are both flat and I just machined four 0.515" spacers (two for each plate). GM was kind enough to make the step between the lower mount surface and the upper mount surface consistent. The hole you see in the passenger side plate is for the turbocharger oil drain return line. The position of this was not so brilliant, but the oil line is a slip fit into the block so it should be manageable. I just need to figure out how to hold it in.

    The sump ended up a little lower than I was hoping, but I was able to retain 3.5" of ground clearance. It's not great, but it should work. There were two limiting factors. The first is the individual coil packs which you can see in one of the pictures below. They are very close to the hood (or bonnet for you English chaps). I might have been able to go another 0.5" higher with the engine by cutting the plugs on these, but this is when limit number two is reached. The main engine oil feed starts interfering with the chassis. You can see this fitting on the picture showing the bottom of the car from the front. I'm going to have a lot of oil lines running under the car...yikes. I guess a skid plate of some sort will be in order. You may also notice that the thermostat housing is really really close to the passenger side pedal box. There is a little margin due to the insulation, but clearly the engine is about as far back as possible.

    I also got the alternator mostly mounted. I still need to clearance the foam rubber injector cover and drill the hole in the lower mount, but I think it will fit...barely. The steering shaft didn't play fair. I originally had the alternator mounted lower, but you can see from the pictures that there is no room for lower. This extra loop is the result of having the car and the mock engine at different locations. Oh well, I enjoyed the hours of milling a useless bottom mount. Maybe someday I'll need to invest in a bridgeport. Overall I'm relatively happy with how the lower mount is looking. It may not be obvious from the pictures, but that somewhat complex shaped aluminum part was done by hand (no CNC). Both mounts need a little finish work, but it's close.

    My next steps are:
    - Install Quaife ATB LSD: I was originally going to start with the open diff to see how bad of one-tire-fires I could produce. The turning point was realizing the gears inside the differential may not survive and Quaife offers a lifetime warranty. I also basically convinced myself that a torque biasing differential was probably better than a plate type. I know this has been discussed endlessly so not everyone will agree, but hopefully I don't find myself with one rear wheel in the air too often anyway.
    - Modify Intake Manifold: This will likely come by way of Bruce at Beachman Racing who has done a similar modification before which will allow me to install the stock manifold (after modification). This should be the lowest risk and cost to get going.
    - Mount Scavenge Pump: I bought a Dailey Engineering 2-stage pump. Finding a place to mount it has been troublesome, but I have a plan. I believe I have room to run a secondary belt off the front of the crank and mount the pump under the water pump on the passenger side. I just don't know how much room I'll have over there with the turbo.
    - Find a home for the Turbo: I decided on a GTX2860R. This should flow a little more than the stock Borg turbo and Tial makes really sweet investment cast turbine housings which will help keep the weight down. Why Garrett hasn't done that is beyond me.
    - Decide on the intercooler: I bought an Air to Air, but the more I look at it the more I think it will be easier to use water to air. I think the IC can fit right in front of the engine which would make the piping really short. I know another turbo 7 had a similar setup with the IC behind the engine, but I don't think I'll be able to make that work because my throttle body points almost straight down. Time will tell.

    I think that's it for now....so close, but yet so far.

    Daniel

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    Last edited by TurboWood; 01-19-2016 at 06:32 AM.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

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    Ok, it's time for an update. First and foremost, I'm back in the U.S. baby!!! The other good news (which is undoubted going to challenge my free time available to finish this thing) is that my wife and I had our first child in February! I returned to to the US in April, but my family wasn't able to join me imidiately. They will join me in mid July assuming everything goes to plan.

    This has left me as a short term bachelor which has granted me some time to adapt to a new position at work and spend some time on the car. Unfortunately work was the priority, but I did just manage a two week binge before stuffing the 7 in the back of a moving truck and bringing it out to my house in CA where I will finish it. It had been in CO.

    So, on to the updates:
    - Installed Quaife ATB differential: This ended up being more difficult than anticipated, but fortunately the bulk of the effort was on Nathan (Thomas Vintage Motors). One of the bearing holders was on so tight that he had to make a special tool and use a 3' extension to get it lose.
    - installed all interior carpet: for this I went with Velcro to hold it in place. In the pictures below I have attempted to show you the evidence of the stitching that can be seen on the trunk and floor mats. Overall I'm quite happy with it and now I can remove anything I want without the headache of glue.
    - Had the clutch disk modified: Over the last few months I realized that I didn't have an accurate measurement for the engagement of the trans input shaft spline and the clutch disk. I knew there was more than zero and probably close to 20mm, but I had forgotten to check this on first assembly. I was too pre-occupied with not bottoming the input shaft on the crankshaft that I just assumed the splines would be ok. So, I took it all apart and discovers I had about 17mm of the 23mm available. This was borderline and a quick call to clutcasters didn't give me confidence it would be ok. Fortunately they told me they could just reverse the hub! In the pictures below you can see the before and after. The side with the snout was swapped to the trans side which worked out perfectly to give me full engagement
    - Sealed the shifter shaft that sticks out the front of the trans: This was another thing I overlooked the first time. Since I had everything apart I added some silicone to seal it.
    - Compleyed the interior: The driveshaft, shifter, and tunnel cover are now done
    - Finished the alternator mount: This was relatively simple. I just needed to drill and tap the final hole and clearance the foam that sits around the fuel injectors (for noise I think) in order to fit the alternator
    - Made good progress on the scavenge pump mount: You can see a few pictures below near the now painted engine mounts. I still need to figure out to exactly to support it on the front side of the engine, but at least it is located now so I can work on plumbing and the belt/pulley
    - Finished crank pulley and mandrel: The ATI crank pulley requires the ID to be honed for your specific crank. I also had to modify the mandrel that bolts to the front of it (for the scavenge pump pulley) to clearance the crank bolt. This was frankly a little annoying that ARE would sell me this part knowing the application, but offering no real advice on how to make it work. They are clearly used to working with race teams that fix everything themselves. So, that's what I did, buy no real thanks to them.


    I'll try to make it a little more clear when I'm not typing this on my phone!


    Daniel

    Picture 1: Baby Wood (Taylor)
    Picture 2: Can loaded in moving truck right before being removed
    Picture 3: Interior with baby seat....is this legal?
    Picture 4: Interior
    Picture 5: Left front area of the trunk showing the evidence of velcro which was sewn on (picture is rotated sideways)
    Picture 6: Floor mat showing evidence of velcro which was sewn on (picture is rotated sideways)
    Picture 7: Right side of engine showing painted engine mount and scavenge pump
    Picture 8: Engine with oil tank sitting in place (probably)
    Picture 9: Similar of picture 7, but better view of scavenge pump mount
    Picture 10: Upside down view of a Colorado sunset last week
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    Last edited by TurboWood; 06-14-2016 at 09:11 AM.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Arkansas...and Houston
    Posts
    2,817

    Default

    Daniel,

    Great photo of Taylor (welcome to 'daddy'hood)! But I have to ask, do your photo postings represent the way you plan on driving the car when finished...upside down and sideways?

    And just so you know you are not alone, I'm putting my Stalker back together (unfinished) for the second time in preparation for a move.
    xcarguy

    One 'very broken' Brunton Stalker, chassis #85, LS6
    http://www471.pair.com/stalkerv/gall...g2_itemId=5938

    Live life with passion; history has proven there’s no getting out of it alive.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

    Default

    Thanks, I hope I can keep the silver side down on this one! I did manage to flip a rotax kart many years ago (turn 2 of the race....DOH!).

    The photos are a better representation of my affinity for technology. Maybe that's why I'm building a car with almost none (I do like fuel injection).

    Daniel

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Orange County
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Congrats on the baby & welcome home! Let's finish this project already! I've been away for the last 3 months & finally have some time to work on mine again

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

    Default

    Working on it! I have the turbo and oil tank (thanks!) placed. Now, I just need to mount them and start working on all the plumbing.

    Daniel

  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

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    Well, I got the ball rolling on registration. I now have an SB100 number . It took a few trips, a big check, and hours of patience, but it's done. Does anyone know if my car is far enough along to get an inspection from the CHP? My understanding is they are most interested in confirming the engine and trans aren't stolen which I believe they can verify as is. Clearly the BAR exam will take a little longer.

    Daniel

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

    Default

    More good news, the CHP has now signed off on the car! Now I just need to finish the car so I can go to the BAR and get a brake and light check. Sweeet.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

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    Gents,
    Here is a bit of teaser pic. I was able to bribe a few friends into helping me make some bigger steps forward. We (they) were able to knock out:

    - Exhaust manifold (still need to punch a hole for the WG --> if you have an eagle eye you can catch the flange where the WG will attach on the down pipe. The WG will basically sit under the turbo (not ideal, but space is an issue)
    - Intake manifold (this was actually Bruce Beachman's work).
    - Intercooler and charge piping. I'm missing a v-band on the intake manifold side, but other than that it's good to go
    - Modified water pipe and thermostat housing. It's difficult to tell in this pic unless you know what you are looking at, but there is a 1.5" water pipe that runs under the exhaust manifold. This used to be much more straight, but prevented the turbo from being mounted where it is
    - Radiator hoses. You can see one of them attached near the intake manifold (radiator is not installed in this pic). the lower hose is blue and runs around the engine under the intake manifold (out of site)
    - Clutch. Long story here, but I had to pull the engine and replace the throw out bearing due to poor installation on yours truly. The GM part is a bit unique and required some adjustment on how I supported it. I'll have to explain later, but it should be fixed now (haven't found the balls to test it again)
    - Intercooler radiator. I bought a custom unit from Bell Intercoolers. It's going to fit (very snuggly) in front of the stock radiator. More pics in the future.
    - Overflow bottle, catch can, windshield washer bottle, and oil filter. You can see some of these, but the oil filter and windshield washer bottle are under the intake manifold so you can't see them from here....more pics later. I also moved the brake/clutch reservoir to the driver's side to shorter the lines (and make room for the overflow and catch can)

    The cooling system is now basically done other than running the lines from the oil cooler (not installed yet), heater, overflow, and turbo (like I said, almost done, haha). Fuel needs one more line from the chassis to the high pressure fuel pump.

    The next big tasks are the oil tank (yeah, I need to fit a 6.5" oil tank in there!), oil cooler (will go above the transmission), air intake (uhhh, ????), and finish the WG. It's all down hill from there!

    Daniel
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  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Bay, CA
    Posts
    253

    Thumbs up

    I finally have updates, and I'm happy to say the updates are significant. It's not running yet, but it's closer. I couldn't figure out how to order the photos in a useful way so I'll try to tell you which pic to look at.

    - Pedal box & throttle pedal (2 first pics): I made a spacer and a new cover (blue protective film still on the cover) for the pedal box. This was necessary to fit the DBW throttle pedal. I made the box out of channel aluminum, but of course I could not find the exact dimensions I wanted so I had to machine the part I had. It was originally 2x1x1/8" channel which is now 1-7/8x5/8x1/16" (ish). That was sort of a pain because I was dealing with a 3ft section which meant I had to machine it in sections. This was limited by the travel of the bed on the mill and the part would vibrate violently if I went far beyond the vice holding it. The spacer is two pieces (one U-shaped and the other straight) riveted together to make the full perimeter. The pedal itself is mounted to the main bolt that the clutch and brake pedal pivot on. There were two 3/8" spacers that Caterham conveniently used which have been replaced by the square looking parts next to the pedal. I made a plate that bolted to those square parts and to the pedal. Then was the challenge of attaching the two pedals which were now working in different planes. The GM DBW pedal moves through approximately 20° and from what I can tell most cars have a 2" travel of the throttle pedal. I figured out that this was achievable by just linking the two parts together as is thanks to the motion ratio on the Caterham pedal. The second picture tries to show you the linkage, but it's not a great view. Basically the link is made by welding two 3/8" rod-ends together to make a sort of offset turnbuckle (that is not adjustable). To link these rod-ends to each pedal a stud (really a cut bolt) was welded to each.

    - Wastegate & exhaust manifold (7th, 9th, and 10th pics): I ended up changing my mind on where to mount the WG. I had originally put the v-band under the turbo, but this created a bad angle between the main flow and the bypassed flow. It also created issues with other plumbing that needed the space which would have been consumed by the tube from the manifold to the WG. I moved the WG as it is shown here now. It's tucked right up next to the block as low as I could make it. This barely clears just about everything. The WG is difficult to package due to all the hoses that need to connect to it. There are four lines attached to it (other than the exhaust gas): boost, vacuum, water in, and water out. This makes the small size of the WG require a rather large packaging space. You can sort of see this in the dark picture. Once the WG was mounted to the down-pipe the rest was relatively easy. I had already cut some tubing that got me from the WG to the exhaust manifold. Unfortunately it was not possible to install the manifold with the long pipe welded to it (I tried it before welding). This meant I needed to add another v-band to the system which you can see nicely attached to the manifold. I still need to clean up some of the welds (internally) and add some heat shields, but it's largely done.

    - Air intake (8th and 11th pics): This turned out to be relatively easy, but had me worried for a long time. In the picture showing the compressor inlet you can see why, there is a large -16AN hose end right in front of the compressor. After some thought and testing a bunch of different fittings I discovered that I could reroute this large hose (this hose is the return line on the dry sump: important!) around the turbo by using a 90° fitting. This cleared the way for what you see in the other picture which is a partially completed inlet tube (next to the compressor outlet pipe). This was made by welding three bends together. In a later picture you can see a big empty space behind the oil tank. This is where the air filter will eventually go. I'll talk more about how this space became so empty later.


    - Turbo oil drain (6th, 12th, and 13th pics): I had not been looking forward to this for a long time. I knew it wasn't that difficult in principle, but figuring out the angles and making it work with the engine was just tricky. The stock system uses an o-ring joint with a hard tube that goes to the turbo. This is convenient for an OEM to assemble. The aftermarket has made adapters to AN fittings which is great if you have room for it. Unfortunately my engine mount goes right in front of this hole in the block. Fortunately the engine mount plate had a hole put in it for just this purpose, but it's not large enough to fit the 10AN fitting the aftermarket companies offer. My turbo is also very low so the tube needs to have tight bends at each end to maximize the angle of the straight-ish portion. On my millionth and one internet search I discovered that Cummins uses corrugated tubing with an o-ring joint on their turbo oil drains. They also have a variety of lengths for different applications! I bought one that I thought would be about the right length and a 6" piece of 3/4" tubing. I machined the tubing down until it barely slipped into the block. After machining in an o-ring grove two pieces were welded together at about 35-40°. The cummins part was not designed for a Garrett turbo so I had to open the holes a bit, but after that it was a matter of bending it and cutting to meet the steel tube. The end result is quite good. I can install the oil drain tube into the engine w/o removing the turbo or any other surrounding part. I very happy that I didn't have to remove the 1.5" water pipe that you can see in the pictures. It's possible, but a pain. Once the drain is in the block then the turbo side is just a challenge of getting your hand in the right place to tighten the bolt. The other happy byproduct of this is that when I disconnect the turbo from the exhaust manifold and this drain tube provides a slight support to hold the turbo. With the light addition of a bunjee cord around the center housing of the turbo it can hang from the chassis w/o issue. This is the only up side to the chassis tube that goes right over the turbo.

    - Oil tank (5th pic): This is the big one (for me at least). I knew it was physically possible to fit the oil tank behind the turbo, but I also know it was very tight and that there were really know straight surfaces to attach it to. After spending hours trying different orientations of the tank I came to the conclusion that it must move rearward. If I moved the tank up to clear the exhaust with the tank vertical then it hit the hood. If I moved it down then I had to tilt the tank in multiple directions to get it to fit. To move it rearward I had to cut a hole in the passenger footwell and move the battery. Moving the battery has the added benefit of making more room for the air filter which was originally planned to squeeze between the coolant overflow tank and the battery. Now I have space to make a nice box and put a naca duct in the hood. Of course figuring out where to put the battery is another story...two steps forward, one step back. Cutting the footwell wasn't terribly difficult. That portion of the footwell is all one piece so I wasn't cutting through riveted/sealed joints. I drilled some holes in an arc to help remove a chunk of material, but ultimately went to town with a rasp. The upper tank mount is actually inside the footwell, bolted to the front surface. The tank is pulled as far back as possible before the clamp starts interfering with the mounting bolts. The lower mount is also attached to the footwell, but on the outside. This surface has a 30° angle so I made some wedged shims for the inside and outside. The final result is good. There still isn't a great amount of clearance with the exhaust (or WG), but it's secure and should be ok with some heat shields.

    - Intercooler system (3rd and 4th pics): I bought a radiator from Bell Intercoolers and cut out the shroud to the radiator. It's a tight fit! The nose cone just barely touches the lower corners of the radiator now. I made sure to make the bottom of the radiator the cold side so hopefully my paint will survive. Then it was a matter of welding some 3/4" tubing to it and routing that around the engine radiator. Then it was just about connecting all the bits together. The pump is strapped to the vertical tube under the intercooler.

    The other things that were completed are:
    - Turbo oil feed (-4AN braided hose from block to turbo)
    - Turbo water cooling hoses (some factory lines combined with random hoses from autozone). The trickiest part was combining the turbo and WG water feed/return. To do this I made double banjo bolts (yes, they can be purchased but I didn't want to wait and it ended up being better to have a socket head cap strew instead of the typical hex head).
    - Fuel line from car to engine. This was harder than it should have been. It took way too long to figure out that the fitting on the engine was the same as what was on the car side (shocking really) which was an M14 inverted flair. Once I figured that out I bought a stock part for the car which on the CSR 260 is a crimped hose barb fitting with this inverted flair. Unfortunately the fitting that I got with this replacement part was slightly different from the one that came with my kit. The biggest issue is that it was smaller in diameter which would limit fuel flow. This is the last thing I need when trying to push >300hp. So, back to the internet where I found a Porsche shop that had a bunch of these fittings in different orientations. Apparently Porsche uses these a lot. So, I bought a 90° fitting and everything worked.

    The major to-do's remaining are:
    - Final install of turbo, oil tank, exhaust, etc.
    - Build firewall for oil tank
    - Build air box and finish intake tubing
    - Route crankcase vent tubing
    - Blow-off valve
    - Mount battery somewhere (next to steering shaft possibly?)

    Easy peasy

    Daniel
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    Last edited by TurboWood; 06-18-2017 at 02:19 PM.

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