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Thread: Gear Oil

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Higganum, CT
    Posts
    1,742

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    I ended up modifying the T9 I had in my old Birkin so I could fill and check the level from above. Here's a link to an old thread and some photos: https://www.usa7s.net/vb/showthread....over-Fill-Plug
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    Bruce

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    318

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    With a flashlight and patience, you can locate the fill hole with the cover off. You might try one of the inexpensive iPhone boroscopes. As Croc said, Ford designed these gearboxes to be lubed for life. While you may experience an eventual input or output shaft seep, it will most likely not prove significant.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    318

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    Finally had enough time to dig out a couple of pics (sorry but my editing skills are a work in progress). In the first one, a cutaway view of the tail shaft, it is obvious that the shifter enclosure is a dry area. In the second picture, the sheetmetal alignment bracket for the selector shaft "locking ring" (more accurately the reverse selector ring) is to be seen attached to the bottom of the top cover. A circular bump with a 1/16" vent hole is located immediately above this bracket. This location prevents gear oil from being slung out under operation. This invariably coats the top of the cover with a fine mist of gear lube over time (apparently an essential component of Ford's anticorrosion program). If you should choose to install a proper vent line, mounting the necessary bung in this bump-out serves to allow only pressure, not mist to enter the vent line.

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