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Thread: 2.0L Duratec Rebuild

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Anker, I wouldn't worry about the crossflow. The SuperSprint spec is a well known formula for those engines and unlike the Duratec, the crossflow was designed to be rebuilt rather than thrown away when old and tired.

    Yeah, I was really surprised by the difficulty. Initially I assumed the machine shop was being lazy, but after multiple Internet searches (I have the blisters on my fingertips to prove it), calls to Clevite/Mahle, ACL, King, and various Focus tuning shops, I realized that wasn't the case. Duratec tuning in the US seems to focus on forced induction rather than spinning at high rpms, and people seem happy with the OE spec. It just seems to me that bearings aren't an area where you should hope they're good enough.

    The excursion to a winery sounds like a good idea, but a side trip to a place where they sell something stronger sounds better

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  2. #32
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    Jan 2006
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    I'm still waiting for the rod bearings to arrive. I'll ping the dealer again to see if they can get an update from King, but I had expected them to be here by now after placing the order with Priority Mail shipping on the 23rd.

    One area I've been kicking around for the build is intake length. Longer pushes the torque peak down, shorter pushes it higher in the rev range, and at some length you hit the sweet spot. That perfect compromise which smooths out the torque curve and maximizes the area beneath it. The default for Duratecs with Jenvey TBs seems to be 90mm, but I've been curious what would happen to the shape of the curve when going longer or shorter, particularly given the other work done to my engine. There are rumors that longer than 90mm produces better results, but I've yet to see actual numbers to back that up. Given longer runners require the air filter to stick further out of the bonnet, which in turn requires a larger hole in said bonnet, I'd rather some hard data before pulling out the saw.

    Although Emerald makes adjustable velocity stacks with a range of 60-130mm (more info here) that are perfect for my needs, the 45mm size required for my TBs have been shown as out of stock for a very, very long time. After speaking with Dave I learned that unless they can find a new supplier willing to do them for a reasonable price, they won't do another run. It sounds like the original shop underestimated the effort, and at the new production cost the retail price becomes, in Dave's words, "silly." Luckily for me, he was able to find a lightly used set in their inventory, so the order was placed this morning.

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    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    USA
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    577

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCh View Post
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    Good golly. Within a year or so, if not now, one could have a simple shape such as intake trumpets 3D-printed in any number of materials, with cost being the only limiting factor. And cost is dropping rapidly. I have recently seen 3D-printed parts in titanium, aluminum, and inconel that had a drop-dead gorgeous finish and were dimensionally accurate for all but the most demanding applications. Maybe you could just get some made? For trial sets, all you'd need is a fuel-resistant material. Or maybe this would end up being more costly - I don't know. Just throwing it out there...
    Sean

  4. #34
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    Jan 2006
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    Hi Sean, I think you missed the part where I wrote that Dave found a lightly used set on the shelves that I bought this morning They were only 100GBP, so not expensive. Although even at the new price of 135GBP for the set, they are a good deal if you want to experiment.

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,779

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    Inconel is an austenitic nickel-chromium-based superalloy


    I had to ask someone over breakfast this morning!
    Mike
    2010 Caterham CSR with Cosworth 2.3 Duratec
    2018 Caterham 420R with 2L Duratec 210hp at Donington UK
    1975 BMW CSL Group 4 (restoration - engine and dry sump install time)
    1977 Holden Torana "A9X" (awaiting restoration)
    1985 Holden Commodore SS Group A
    1985 Holden Commodore Group A
    1982 Ferrari 400i
    1965 Ford Mustang Fastback "Holman Moody"
    1992 Ford Escort RS Cosworth WRC (fettling after long period of storage)
    1990 Range Rover 2 door Classic
    and another project car coming....

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Laurel MD
    Posts
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    The most common use of Inconel is turbo mounting bolts, it has crazy heat properties and turbo mounting bolts live in a very inhospitable place. I have user then on a couple of turbo cars with success. I think in the F1 world they 3D print exhaust system using it.

    https://www.extreme-bolt.com/product...nel-bolts.html

    Graham

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    70

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    They could easily be made on my 3D printer in ABS or Nylon, both of which are fuel resistant and heat resistant enough for trumpets. I can't print in metal (yet).

    Anker
    1987 Caterham 1700 Supersprint
    2002 Porsche Boxster
    2004 Porsche Boxster S
    1941 Dodge Luxury Liner
    2009 Mercedes CLK 350 Cabriolet
    2017 Chevrolet Volt

  8. #38
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    Jan 2006
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    Seattle-ish
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    The rod bearings turned up yesterday. However, thanks to flooding and mudslides impacting my commute, I'm working from home this week and probably won't have an opportunity to drop them off at the shop until early next week. Yes, it's wet. Even for Seattle.

    More good news; the head arrived a couple of hours ago. Steve said it was in great shape and he didn't see the need to do further porting than his original job 13 years ago. However, he did re-profile the backside of the valves this time, which in his experience can help airflow as much as blending the seats. The laundry list of work included:

    Clean head and valves
    Surface head
    Machine seats and reface valves
    Modify valves with performance upgrades
    Valve seal set
    Install new cams, set valve lash to provided specs, assemble

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  9. #39
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    Jul 2009
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    Arkansas and . . .
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    3,574

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    John, I’ll be very interested to see what numbers you come with using those adjustable stacks.
    Stalker V8, chassis #85

    Stalker Chassis #85 Build Gallery
    Stalker Chassis #85 Owner Thread

    Get up in the morning and give the day your very best. You donít get it back.

  10. #40
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    Given Murphy seems to rule my life with his eponymous Law, 90mm will probably prove to be the optimal length, but I still want to see the numbers.

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

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