Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: 2.0L Duratec Rebuild

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South Lyon Michigan
    Posts
    206

    Default

    A possible option for attaching your windage tray and using red Loctite, is to simple safety wire hex head bolts without a locking agent. Dave W

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,201

    Default

    Raceline used the dome head screws due to clearance issues, so not enough room to use that option. The Torx head replacements should do the job, and if not, I'm keeping the phone number for the mobile welder on file

    Mike, someone provided a link to the Cosworth manual on another thread. I'll see if I can find it and add it here. Unfortunately the copy I downloaded is too big to attach to a post.

    EDITED: Found the link: http://duratecindetail.com/pdf/CSR260_Build_Manual.pdf

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,201

    Default

    One interesting realization for me when looking at the Cosworth build manual is that there are physical design differences between the 2.3L and my 2.0L block. If you compare the left side and right side oil drains on the 2.3L as captured in the screenshot from the Cosworth manual, you will see they are different, whereas they are mirror images on my 2.0L. I wonder if this is a a running design change on all Duratec blocks or is a consistent difference between the 2.3L and 2.0L?

    Attachment 16170

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    561

    Default

    John,

    I'm no expert, but Ken at Cosworth told me the CSR motors used a Ranger block with a Focus head, as there were differences in blocks and heads for those two applications. He said the truck block lacks the counterbalance stuff and the car head breathes better. There may be other differences he didn't mention. This may account for the difference you're seeing?
    Sean

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,201

    Default

    Good call Sean. The balance shaft assembly attaches to that end of the block, so they likely needed to open up the area around the oil drains for clearance.

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,201

    Default

    One of the reasons I'm at this stage for what should have been a simple oil pump change, is my aversion to the Duratec's lack of a key to lock the crank pulley and cam chain sprocket in place. Although the factory design, which relies entirely on friction washers and clamping force to keep things in place, does work, it's all too easy for a klutz like me to allow a degree or two of slippage when torquing down the bolt, thus affecting timing. It's also a little tough to do that process with the engine in the car or do it solo. Keying the crank assembly resolves those issues and provides additional assurance that no slipping will occur over time.

    There were a few options to have this work done. To minimize the risk of things turning out badly, I opted to buy pre-keyed crank pulley, timing chain sprocket and 3mm key from SBD in the UK, and then have a local machine shop cut the keyway in the crank to SBD's instructions. This approach added about $150 to the total, which I view as cheap insurance. As to why my aversion got me to this stage? Well, if you're going to remove the crank to key it, you might as well remove the pistons and rods and balance the assembly. If the pistons and rods are coming out, might as well replace them with something better. If new pistons that allow for greater valve lift are going in, it would be a shame not to replace the cams to take advantage of that. As long as bearings and seals are removed, replacement with new is an easy decision. Of course if those things are new, it would be a shame if another consumable like the water pump or clutch slave cylinder went out shortly after the car was back on the road, so might as well replace those too. Etc. Etc. Etc…

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	keyed assembly sm.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	84.5 KB 
ID:	16178

    John - Czar of the Slippery Slope
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Arkansas and . . .
    Posts
    3,413

    Default

    One change begets another.
    Stalker V8, chassis #85

    Stalker Chassis #85 Build Gallery
    Stalker Chassis #85 Owner Thread

    Get up in the morning and give the day your very best. You don’t get it back.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,201

    Default

    With the engine out of the way, this is a good time to clean up the under bonnet area. First up was removing the peeling aluminized heat barrier cloth from the exhaust side of the tub and replacing it with gold heat reflective film. The heat cloth was originally affixed to the inside of the tub to protect the fiberglass from the heat of the primaries which are snaked into a very confined area. The gold film is supposedly just as effective as the aluminized cloth, but is a little lighter, and adds a touch of under-bonnet bling. I'm all about the bling.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tub heat shield.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	92.1 KB 
ID:	16179

    The header situation was foreshadowed in an earlier post. As previously mentioned, the header from Raceline fouled the right front wheel on full lock. Raceline decided it was better for me to have a local shop fabricate the replacement with my car on hand to ensure it would fit, rather than remake it themselves to measurements I supplied. The shop used the Raceline header for tubing diameter measurements and followed Raceline's instructions for tubing length. This is where things got interesting. Raceline explained that a Westfield has slightly more room for the secondaries than a Caterham, but for manufacturing simplicity, their Caterham and Westfield manifolds share the same dimensions. However, secondaries longer than supplied were better for performance. Given my car theoretically had room for slightly longer secondaries, they instructed the shop to make the primaries to their standard 30-31" length and the secondaries "as long as possible."

    The thinking was that my setup would gain perhaps 2" in secondary length. Seems simple enough, right? And remember, the shop had the original Raceline-supplied manifold on hand for a pattern. Imagine my surprise when I arrived at the shop to admire their work only to discover this:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	header.jpg 
Views:	36 
Size:	75.3 KB 
ID:	16180

    It seems they had taken Raceline's instructions as a challenge. Rather than follow the template of the Raceline header, which had gradual bends and placed about 1/3 of each primary tube outside the tub, they opted to snake the primaries to such a degree that those tubes and the collectors fit inside the tub allowing them to really make the secondaries "as long as possible." In this case that's about 21".

    Consensus among various Duratec tuners is this extreme length is probably costing power, but because no one seems to have tested such a setup on the dyno, it's not clear if it's a lot, a little, or if it is actually bumping up other areas of the torque curve with minimal impact to peak power. Next year, I plan to have this remade to a more conventional design with slightly larger tubing to take advantage of the cams, but first I'd like to spend some time becoming familiar with the new torque curve and extensively researching exhaust manifold design.

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCh View Post
    The gold film is supposedly just as effective as the aluminized cloth, but is a little lighter, and adds a touch of under-bonnet bling. I'm all about the bling.
    Duratecs pump out a lot of heat. Is there a body melting temperature that you have to worry about? Never thought of that until reading your post?
    Mike
    2010 Caterham CSR with Cosworth 2.3 Duratec
    2018 Caterham 420R with 2L Duratec 210hp at Donington UK
    1975 BMW CSL Group 4 (restoration - engine and dry sump install time)
    1977 Holden Torana "A9X" (awaiting restoration)
    1985 Holden Commodore Group A (restoration - engine rebuild)
    1982 Ferrari 400i (will repaint to original color in 2020)
    1965 Ford Mustang Fastback "Holman Moody"
    1992 Ford Escort RS Cosworth WRC (fettling after long period of storage)
    1990 Range Rover 2 door Classic

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,201

    Default

    Purely down to paranoia and cheap insurance. I knew that portion of the tub would be subjected to a lot of long term heat and I was concerned that over time there might be some discoloration or slight deformation of the fiberglass. I never would have done it if the primaries weren't snaked into that area so tightly.

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •