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Thread: 2.0L Duratec Rebuild

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    NC
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    163

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    I for sure would of chosen the head off the Ford Fusion 2.5 , Great Build tho !

    Tom

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
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    The 2.5L head flows better but the ports are different and would require new throttle bodies and header to mate up. Given my current head is more than capable of meeting my power target, and I already have 45mm direct-to-head throttle bodies and a custom header, what would I gain replacing those and using the 2.5L head?

    Thanks,
    John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,778

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCh View Post
    Would not have affected you - you have a canoe? No motor right now admittedly but if you paddle hard....

    Mike
    2010 Caterham CSR with Cosworth 2.3 Duratec
    2018 Caterham 420R with 2L Duratec 210hp at Donington UK
    1975 BMW CSL Group 4 (restoration - engine and dry sump install time)
    1977 Holden Torana "A9X" (awaiting restoration)
    1985 Holden Commodore SS Group A
    1985 Holden Commodore Group A
    1982 Ferrari 400i
    1965 Ford Mustang Fastback "Holman Moody"
    1992 Ford Escort RS Cosworth WRC (fettling after long period of storage)
    1990 Range Rover 2 door Classic
    and another project car coming....

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,277

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    There is too big a hole in the bottom where the engine once sat. I'd have better luck with the ass-engined car in my garage since it is related to this:

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    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    163

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    I Build a lot of these 2.0 , 2.3 , 2.5 , I have a 2.0 with 2.5 head SCCA legal 11.1 compression , stock2.5 intake manifold , stock Focus TB ( killing us ) no port work , stock valves , crower stg3 cams making 205 whp

    With ITB like you have if you hit the 220 whp mark with the 2.0 head the 2.5 head would add 10-15 whp to that maybe more because of the higher flowing ITB , where the header bolts to the 2.5 head is the same as the 2.0 so you wouldnt need to change the header , the intake is MUCH bigger and would need addressing

    Tom

    Tom

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,277

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    Thanks Tom, is that 10-15hp increase compared to a stock 2.0L, stock 2.3L, or a ported head? How does it affect the shape of the torque curve? Is it all at the top end or does the revised shape have a meaningful increase at low-mid rpm?

    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Big gain from a 2.0 -2.5 and very good gain from a 2.3 head to a 2.5 , you cant port the 2.0 to flow what the 2.3 stock head flows and same from a 2.3 to a 2.5

    Very usable gain from 2500 to 7500 +

    Tom

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,277

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    Looking at Jenvey's site, the TBs for the 2.5L are available in 48mm or 50mm whereas they make them from 40mm-50mm for the 2.0L & 2.3L heads either under their brand or partners like Raceline. I intentionally went for the 45mm vs larger when building the original engine 16 years ago as I was advised based on extensive dyno testing, the 45mm is best under 250hp as it will flow to that level and keeps port velocity up to help at low rpm, particularly important when you are doing a 2.0L rather than a 2.3L. The 2.5L sounds like a great option for someone looking for big power or doing a clean sheet build who wants to maintain significant headroom, but I think it's overkill for my needs, particularly given my starting point.

    Thanks,
    John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    1,277

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    The adjustable airhorns from Emerald arrived. Given they slide into the TB, they have a narrower throat than the standard 90mm airhorns (43mm vs. 45mm). They also don't have a flared bell mouth which in theory should further impact airflow. The torque curve comparison when they are set at 90mm should be interesting. One thing I didn't realize is that the adjustment range stated on Emerald's site doesn't apply to my Jenveys without surgery. They should adjust down to 60mm, but at anything less than 77mm they foul the butterfly. Here are comparisons at 77mm, 130mm and looking down the throats.

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    -John
    '95 Westfield SEiW w/2.0L Duratec
    '68 Lotus Elan FHC
    '91 Miata w/Flyin Miata suspension & brakes
    '95 Porsche 993 C2
    '86 Porsche 944 turbo (neglected project car)
    Throttle Steer

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    70

    Default

    It seems to me that this is an ideal project for 3D printing. I have a decent 3D printer that can print nylon, and ABS, both of which have enough heat resistance to work. I may give this a stab so I can shift the performance curve around depending on what type of driving I am doing. Shorter for high RPM track sessions, longer for autocross where you stay in gear at turns and need lots of grunt t get up to speed again.

    With the stack you got the step in the inlet is not good at all. Airflow will stop being laminar at the break and it will also cause a secondary reflection of the shock wave that is bouncing back and forth between your intake valve and the mouth of the trumpet. The transition between the trumpet and the carb inlet needs to be as smooth as possible.
    1987 Caterham 1700 Supersprint
    2002 Porsche Boxster
    2004 Porsche Boxster S
    1941 Dodge Luxury Liner
    2009 Mercedes CLK 350 Cabriolet
    2017 Chevrolet Volt

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