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Thread: Chassis Stands

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    274

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    For the restoration of my '62 I picked up a very well used Harbor Freight utility trailer. I welded a steel channel to the middle and then fab'd a couple of vertical posts for each end with pivot tubes at the top. What I ended up with is a portable rotisserie. It is unbelievable convenient to work on the car and also very easy to move around the shop, not to mention tow to remote sites as may sometimes be required. The powder coating folks loved it when they blasted the chassis.




    It may seem like overkill but it has proven to be extremely user friendly. Today when I was finalizing the wiring harness and plumbing in the aft bay (boot) it was very nice to be able to flip the car on it's side and work on everything right in front of you.



    I just use jack stands to steady the car when it if right side up.



    And it only takes up a little more space than the car itself.

    The height of the end posts are adjustable in 1" increments. for travel I usually lower the chassis to redo on a piece of plywood on the surface of the trailer.
    Ron

    '14 Evora IPS
    '84 Turbo Esprit
    '77 S1 (deceased)
    '62 Lotus Seven S2 109E Cosworth

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    St.Louis, MO
    Posts
    972

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    A demonstration of "work smarter, not harder". Very unique and useful.
    Jerry

    WCM Ultralite S2K (Sold 8/17)

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Roswell GA
    Posts
    916

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    The aluminum fab work looks great, did you use the original skin for patterns?
    Life happens while you're making other plans
    1995 Caterham Crossflow RHD
    1990 Miata
    2013 Mini (Her's)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    3

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    Nice!! Tell us about making those side panels.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    274

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    Quote Originally Posted by coffee break View Post
    The aluminum fab work looks great, did you use the original skin for patterns?
    Thank you both, Coffee Break and Jerry, for the kind words.

    Yes I did make patterns from the original skins. but in the end, a friend of mine had a new chassis shipped over and I was able to take advantage of his shipping container, so while I did fab the floor, footwell, pedal garage and boot interior panels I did not fab the exterior skins, driveshaft tunnel, cowl and bonnets (I have 2 bonnets, one in the original S2 style and a second piece for regular driving that is louvred in the later Caterham style for regular driving and track days). Prior to installation I polished all of the exterior panels. I'm hoping that I don't regret that decision for maintenance reasons in the long term. Here's a pic of the Arch Motors order all laid out on the driveway on the day that I unpacked the shipment:


    I Installed the side skins on my rotisserie trailer in the driveway at home. I had to remove the chassis from the rotisserie to install the rear wrap around panel. So I did that portion of the re-skin on a workbench for convenience.


    The side panels went on in a couple of hours for each side. To ease the riveting I used a pneumatic rivet gun wherever space and access permitted. I also applied high strength gray silicone sealant to all of the seams and mating surfaces prior to attachment of all of the skins except for the hand wrapped portions of the cockpit arches and rear panel where heat had to be applied for annealing. I used 0.06" thick 6061 aluminum for the structural pieces, i.e. the floor and torque boxes instead of the original 0.03" material. Everything else is 5051 (or the UK equivalent) for ease of forming. In addition to the polishing I did some engine turning on a few of the pieces (I've always wanted a Bugatti!).

    As a side note, if you have ever seen the program, "How It's Made, Dream Cars: Caterham", installation of the hand wrapped panels looks simple. In actual practice it takes a fair amount of skill. It took 3 long days to wrap the rear corners and side arches! Also, I paid a visit to Arch Motors a year ago and was given hands on instruction in how to install the rear and side arch panels. It proved to be a wise investment.

    The car is back on it's wheels as of this past weekend. The engine is in and I have done the new cam break-in run. So far, so good. I still have quite a bit of work to do but I'm optimistic that it might be drivable by the end of the month.
    Ron

    '14 Evora IPS
    '84 Turbo Esprit
    '77 S1 (deceased)
    '62 Lotus Seven S2 109E Cosworth

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