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Thread: Duratec camshaft change

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    200

    Default Duratec camshaft change

    Can the cams be changed in a Duratec with the motor in the car? It seems to me that the only real question is the chain tensioner.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Southeastern Pa.
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    2,773

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    I would assume so, as I had a head gasket replacement done without pulling the motor.
    Mangia bene, Ridi spesso, Ama molto, Guidare veloce

    2000 Caterham Superlight #123
    1.8L VHPD Rover K Series
    2009 Caterham SV
    2.3L Cosworth Duratec

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    N. California
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    57

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    papak,
    You can pull the cams in the car if you can get to the bolts that allow you to hold the tensioner released. I found a copy of a set of Cosworth instructions that's pretty good. Here's the link:

    http://dubaipetrolheads.com/biggles/...ft_install.pdf

    We are nearly ready to fire up the motor in my car (Finally!!). I'm planning lighting it off on Monday with the students, once the initial break in is done it's going to be strapped to the dyno.

    What cams are you going to use? As I recall you had some Crower Stage 1's in the car. We're trying Crower Stage 2's. If you need some new buckets drop me a line, I have a bunch of them!

    Andy
    Last edited by ashyers; 03-22-2019 at 10:46 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    The Frozen Northeast
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    Technically i think it 'may' be possible. practically i don't think so.
    When i changed mine I remember needing to remove the front cover (and crank pulley) which could not be done with engine in the car. In theory if you are able to get the tensioners disengaged, you should be able to do it with engine in.
    Either way you'll be getting intimate with your car.

    let us know how you make out
    p.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    This is in the “consideration” stage right now before I seek a spousal spending authorization. I’ll take a close look at the link. The Stage one cams currently in the car only have 1500 miles or so on them. I would venture that another set of new cams would not be likely to need new buckets but I would certainly check them. On a side note, I have pulled the front cover with the motor in the car. It’s a pain in the ass to do it by yourself as I did. I actually acquired the tool to hold the crank pully. I would have assistance this time around. I’ll keep the thread updated if I move ahead with this. Thanks for the feedback.

  6. #6
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    Dec 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    That’s a very helpful guide, Andy. A real confidence builder!

    Kevin

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    N. California
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    Kevin,
    We had planned to pull the cams with the motor in the car, but my car has a Ranger front cover with a giant idler pulley that once drove a fan. When the orig. builder rerouted the belt to get to the right side alternator the upper bolt hole for accessing the timing rail was eliminated because it was in the belt's path. We discovered this in process and had to pull the cover off. Of course we had to tear down the entire engine in the end to fix a mess of issues... Had the bolt hole been there I think the only tough bit would have been locking the tensioner in it's retracted state.

    We should have it running next week and after some break in miles I'll have some dyno runs you're welcome to check out with the Crower Stage 2 cams.

    Andy

  8. #8
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    Dec 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    When i rebuilt my motor, (out of a 2008 Ranger), I acquired a Focus front cover for just that reason. If I can figure out the idler retraction, I'll feel better about moving forward.

    Kevin

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    N. California
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    Kevin,
    The idler is a ratchet mechanism. Once you lift the pawl it doesn't take too much chain tension to cause the plunger to retract. You'll just need the right pick to lift the pawl out of engagement. There's not that much tension on the spring, I believe most of the tensioning is done via oil pressure and the ratchet/pawl is just to maintain tension when the engine is off.

    Andy

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    I recall that when I originally went through the motor, I fully disassembled the tensioner to make sure everything was perfectly clean. I also installed new plastic guides. Simple but effective design.

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