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Thread: Aluma Tilt Trailer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Ft Lauderdale
    Posts
    74

    Default Aluma Tilt Trailer

    I am looking for a new trailer and like the idea of the Aluma Tilt does anyone use one of these or any thoughts

    https://www.alumaklm.com/6810h-utili...railer-options

    As I am in Florida and I have to special order on I am concerned that the nose will hit the bed before the wheels lift it up

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Bozeman MT
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    493

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    I looked at Aluma a few years back (there's a local dealer making it easy) and I was serious about buying one until I had a realization......if when driving up onto the trailer the front wheels go past the pivot point of the bed before the rears start rolling on it won't work.

    If the fronts pass the bed pivot before the rears are on then the weight of the front of the car will push down in front of the pivot and the rear of the bed it will pivot and will rise up hitting the bottom of the car before the rears can roll on.

    I measured the beds at the local dealer and none were even close to long enough to allow the rears to get onto the bed before the fronts pass the pivot....so i ended up going in a different direction.

    I'm sure glad I had that realization before buying it and getting it home!

    So double and triple check the distance from the rear edge of the bed forward to the pivot to see if it's shorter than your wheelbase. I think most ATV's and side-by-sides will have such short wheelbases that they will work but very few cars will.

    I hope that helps.

    dave

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Laurel MD
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I liked the look of these, a covered trailer without the expense, they also do cover options for existing trailers

    http://serpentexpress.com/

    Graham

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I am going to comment on this post and also the next one. It sounds as if this is a tilt bed trailer. If you have a clearance issue with the nose, a solution is to add some ramps to the back of the trailer to modify the car’s angle of approach. You can put either a floor jack or a block of some sort under the back edge of the trailer so that it won’t drop all the way to the ground. With the ramps lengthening the path onto the trailer, your car will go on at a more shallow angle and not have a problem.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I am not sure where my first reply sequenced in on this post, but here are the rest of my thoughts. I will explain this in relation to my personal trailer. It has a 22 foot long tilt bed. I have some low front clearance vehicles, and also small vehicles that are short enough to allow me to put two cars on the trailer at the same time. Using a couple of removable ramps as mentioned in my first reply allows me to take care of the low front clearance issue by lengthening the approach bath and jacking up the rear of the trailer a few inches to get it off the ground. When I load my WWII Jeep with its military trailer attached, or the Jeep without trailer with my Lotus 7 behind it, the extension ramps also assist. My tilt bed automatically tips back down to towing position when the car being loaded gets far enough on to move the center of gravity forward. If the Jeep trailer wheels are on the ramps, this weight keeps the trailer tipped up long enough to get everything on. Loading the Jeep and Lotus is a little more complicated. First, I drive the Jeep onto the trailer, but not far enough forward to tip the front back down. Then, I drive the front wheels of the Lotus over the ramps, putting the car part way onto the trailer. That holds the back end down while the Jeep gets moved the rest of the way forward. The Lotus is then moved forward, and the trailer bed pivots into towing position. Hopefully, this makes sense.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Gresham, Oregon
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Tilt trailers are great, you don't have to mess with ramps. I have had some very low cars with splitters on this trailer.
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    Mike
    2005 WCM Ultralite S2K

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Davemk1 View Post
    I looked at Aluma a few years back (there's a local dealer making it easy) and I was serious about buying one until I had a realization......if when driving up onto the trailer the front wheels go past the pivot point of the bed before the rears start rolling on it won't work.

    If the fronts pass the bed pivot before the rears are on then the weight of the front of the car will push down in front of the pivot and the rear of the bed it will pivot and will rise up hitting the bottom of the car before the rears can roll on.
    I've seen lots of guys puts lightweight race cars on tilt-bed trailers and they work even when the front wheels past the pivot point. I think you are overlooking the influence of leverage.

    While the front tires have passed the pivot point the amount of leverage they can put on the tilt bed is fairly small compared to the leverage/force imparted by the all weight of the long tilt bed extending back, behind the pivot point. The makers of these trailers know what they're doing and they make these trailers in a wide variety of styles and sizes to suit all sorts of cars. If you're in doubt, take your car to a dealer and try one out.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Midland, TX
    Posts
    479

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    I have an Alumina 6812HTILT and loading my Westfield couldn't be simpler. First, unlike a fixed bed trailer with ramps, the bottom of the car negotiates the transition just fine. Then, as DaveMK points out, when the front wheels pass the pivot point, the bed tilts up but with very little force, as Nick says. I drive the car up and pause to let the bed tilt up, then drive it to the chocks I bolted to the trailer bed. There's no concern for hitting the nose, as the chocks prevent that. I even have a Stanley toolbox bolted to the deck at the front of the trailer to hold the tie-down strraps, lug nut wrench, flashlight, etc. I also like that the Alumina is only 7'10" outside width compared to the standard 8'6" that seems to be the norm, as it makes the maneuverability on city streets lower stress for me.
    Last edited by NVP66S; 01-30-2019 at 01:12 AM.
    Westfield SEiW
    Done building, now grinning

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Bozeman MT
    Posts
    493

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick O'Teen View Post
    I've seen lots of guys puts lightweight race cars on tilt-bed trailers and they work even when the front wheels past the pivot point. I think you are overlooking the influence of leverage.

    While the front tires have passed the pivot point the amount of leverage they can put on the tilt bed is fairly small compared to the leverage/force imparted by the all weight of the long tilt bed extending back, behind the pivot point. The makers of these trailers know what they're doing and they make these trailers in a wide variety of styles and sizes to suit all sorts of cars. If you're in doubt, take your car to a dealer and try one out.
    You are of course correct - it's not that the front wheels passing the pivot is the only issue but it's by how far and with how much weight.

    My larger point, poorly made, is that one needs to be mindful of the length of the wheelbase relative to the length of the behind-the-pivot portion of the bed. The only way to be 100% sure it will work out is to roll the car on and see what you get.

    dave

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Midland, TX
    Posts
    479

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    Quote Originally Posted by Davemk1 View Post
    You are of course correct - it's not that the front wheels passing the pivot is the only issue but it's by how far and with how much weight.

    My larger point, poorly made, is that one needs to be mindful of the length of the wheelbase relative to the length of the behind-the-pivot portion of the bed. The only way to be 100% sure it will work out is to roll the car on and see what you get.

    dave
    Yeah, you need to check what exactly hits when the trailer deck rises above the ground. It wouldn't be very nice if it hit the brake lines.
    Westfield SEiW
    Done building, now grinning

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