Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: BDR oil leaks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    33

    Default BDR oil leaks

    I am trying to track down the oil leaks in my new to me dry-sumped BDR. Engine was rebuilt by Quicksilver RacEngines 1000 miles ago. I have wiped everything off, driven it, and then let it sit. There's a drip of oil under the tank, some oil around the sump, and the side-mount oil pump is very oily. I did re-torque the sump pan nuts, although I couldn't reach two of them as the starter is in the way and I didn't feel like taking it off yet. It has leaked maybe a few tablespoons in a few days. The previous owner mentioned a valve that I can get that will prevent the oil from running by gravity from the tank back into the sump when the engine is off. Can anyone point me towards one of those? Of course I am going to try to tighten every hose connection (all threaded fittings). Any advice on particular areas to check or methods to find and eliminate the leaks would be greatly appreciated. Also it would be great to connect with any other BDR owners, to be able to share information in the future. Thanks.

    -Jeff

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jcerier View Post
    I am trying to track down the oil leaks in my new to me dry-sumped BDR. Engine was rebuilt by Quicksilver RacEngines 1000 miles ago. I have wiped everything off, driven it, and then let it sit. There's a drip of oil under the tank, some oil around the sump, and the side-mount oil pump is very oily. I did re-torque the sump pan nuts, although I couldn't reach two of them as the starter is in the way and I didn't feel like taking it off yet. It has leaked maybe a few tablespoons in a few days. The previous owner mentioned a valve that I can get that will prevent the oil from running by gravity from the tank back into the sump when the engine is off. Can anyone point me towards one of those? Of course I am going to try to tighten every hose connection (all threaded fittings). Any advice on particular areas to check or methods to find and eliminate the leaks would be greatly appreciated. Also it would be great to connect with any other BDR owners, to be able to share information in the future. Thanks.

    -Jeff
    I read advice somewhere in the 7 community and stuck with it while troubleshooting all my fluid leaks (when I started I had coolant/oil/windshield washer/fuel and transmission leaks). With me having an Accusump system, remote filter and an oil cooler it was a LOT of lines to try to nail the leaks from.

    The advice was to take paper towels and zip tie pieces around connection points. 90% of the time it has worked every time.

    Now I'm down to leaking from the bell housing and I think the washer bottle loses fluid under hard right turns and spits it on the windshield. Regardless give that a try.
    2001 Caterham Superlight R

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Brilliant! I'll give it a try. Thanks so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vovchandr View Post
    I read advice somewhere in the 7 community and stuck with it while troubleshooting all my fluid leaks (when I started I had coolant/oil/windshield washer/fuel and transmission leaks). With me having an Accusump system, remote filter and an oil cooler it was a LOT of lines to try to nail the leaks from.

    The advice was to take paper towels and zip tie pieces around connection points. 90% of the time it has worked every time.

    Now I'm down to leaking from the bell housing and I think the washer bottle loses fluid under hard right turns and spits it on the windshield. Regardless give that a try.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    philadelphiaish
    Posts
    50

    Default

    My car has a BDR in it, but I'm wet sumped so not too much to add.

    I've been gathering information about BDR motors but they're hen's teeth in the states. I found it very helpful to join the British 7 club, lots of good information over there.

    If you can speak Japanese the BDR has a serious cult following over there.
    '87 Caterham Cosworth BDR 1700 "HPC Spec"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    536

    Default

    Cars with dry sumps always mark their spot on the garage floor. They are not asserting some kind of dominant behavior or anything, it's purely by design.

    The oil in the system wants to find it's gravitational level. Oil in the tank migrates through the gears in the pressure section of the pump and finds it's way into the crankcase sump. Since the sump is so shallow, the oil level eventually submerges much of the crank seals. Oil will piss out on the floor over time since crank seals are not designed to be submerged.

    Any plumbing that is below the level of the oil in the tank constitutes a potential leak as well, although these can usually be sorted out.

    This is what you need...
    Name:  4154SEF4A0L._SX466_.jpg
Views: 124
Size:  14.4 KB
    -Bob

    94 HPC
    Swindon\Vauxhall C20XE

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    33

    Default

    That is the exact pan that is catching my car's drips as I type :-).

    Isn't there a way to keep the oil in the tank from flowing back through the pump when the engine is off?

    Quote Originally Posted by bsimon View Post
    Cars with dry sumps always mark their spot on the garage floor. They are not asserting some kind of dominant behavior or anything, it's purely by design.

    The oil in the system wants to find it's gravitational level. Oil in the tank migrates through the gears in the pressure section of the pump and finds it's way into the crankcase sump. Since the sump is so shallow, the oil level eventually submerges much of the crank seals. Oil will piss out on the floor over time since crank seals are not designed to be submerged.

    Any plumbing that is below the level of the oil in the tank constitutes a potential leak as well, although these can usually be sorted out.

    This is what you need...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    536

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jcerier View Post
    That is the exact pan that is catching my car's drips as I type :-).

    Isn't there a way to keep the oil in the tank from flowing back through the pump when the engine is off?
    I've heard of people installing check valves to stop the back flow. I'm not a big fan of check valves. Personally, I feel the oil supply to the pump should be as unrestricted as possible. Extra parts create extra problems.
    The use of check valves in dry sump systems will also create great debate in auto forums...YMMV
    -Bob

    94 HPC
    Swindon\Vauxhall C20XE

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Wouldn't the check valve have to stop flow in the same direction as the flow when the engine is running, i.e. tank outlet to pump inlet? Doesn't make sense to me...

    Quote Originally Posted by bsimon View Post
    I've heard of people installing check valves to stop the back flow. I'm not a big fan of check valves. Personally, I feel the oil supply to the pump should be as unrestricted as possible. Extra parts create extra problems.
    The use of check valves in dry sump systems will also create great debate in auto forums...YMMV

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    536

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jcerier View Post
    Wouldn't the check valve have to stop flow in the same direction as the flow when the engine is running, i.e. tank outlet to pump inlet? Doesn't make sense to me...
    They use the check valve as what I would consider a MacGyvered residual pressure valve. The spring is relied upon to keep the valve closed against gravitational pressure. When the engine starts the higher operating pressure opens the valve fully (or so you hope). You can see why I'm not a big fan.
    -Bob

    94 HPC
    Swindon\Vauxhall C20XE

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Thinking through it I figured that is what they are doing. I might try it anyway, but there has to be a more elegant way to solve that problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by bsimon View Post
    They use the check valve as what I would consider a MacGyvered residual pressure valve. The spring is relied upon to keep the valve closed against gravitational pressure. When the engine starts the higher operating pressure opens the valve fully (or so you hope). You can see why I'm not a big fan.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •