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Thread: Clutch release arm

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    17

    Default Clutch release arm

    Question about a T9 5 speed with a cable clutch. In adjusting the clutch cable when I was having trouble getting into reverse, I've found that the clutch release arm is hitting the bell housing and has actually put a small notch into it where it hits. It has to go this far in order to fully disengage the clutch, and I'm not sure that even then the clutch is fully disengaging as reverse is still a bit difficult. Is there an adjustment that I'm missing or is this a sign that the arm has somehow bent? Could the release bearing be causing this? Any suggestions? Thanks.






  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Central WA
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    102

    Default

    A little different, but may be pertinent. On my T9 5 speed, with hydraulic actuation, a stop had to be added because the arm was traveling too far, over center, allowing the clutch to drag. The symptom was hard shifting. Adding a travel stop fixed the problem.
    2003 Birkin

  3. #3
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    Dec 2017
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alfonse View Post
    A little different, but may be pertinent. On my T9 5 speed, with hydraulic actuation, a stop had to be added because the arm was traveling too far, over center, allowing the clutch to drag. The symptom was hard shifting. Adding a travel stop fixed the problem.
    That's interesting. How did you know that was the problem? I added a pedal stop to stop the arm at the bell housing and that made it impossible to get into any gear telling me that the clutch was really not disengaging.

  4. #4
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    Feb 2016
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    Central WA
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    After several removal and disassembly operations trying to fix hard shifting, replacing synchros, etc. Eventually figured it out noticing how the arm interacted with the throw out bearing the bearing interacting with the clutch. Move it too far, and the clutch re-engages somewhat.
    2003 Birkin

  5. #5
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    Dec 2017
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    Default

    If it has to be an engine out, I certainly want it to be just once!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
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    170

    Default cable clutch adjustment

    Not sure if this applies for your application, but here is what I did to correct clutch problem alignment.

    I had to make a longer pivot arm bolt to move the clutch arm closer to the pressure plate. Since the bolt is threaded, obtained a longer bolt and ground the head to match the profile of the old bolt. If the bolt protrudes through the back side of the bellhousing, ground a slot or a square so the bolt can be adjusted externally.

    Wayne

  7. #7
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    Dec 2017
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    Wayne,
    This is all a bit over my head so apologies if this is a stupid question. When you say pivot arm bolt is that the same thing as the clutch arm fulcrum pin which is attached to the bellhousing? I’ve seen a picture of the inside of the bellhousing and there is a washer behind this pin and I can appreciate how that would change the throw on the clutch arm. I’m interested in your solution on how to make it externally adjustable. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    95

    Default

    When I did my Honda K24 to a Miata trans swap I had a devil of a problem with the clutch. I had the engine out 3 or 4 times, tried new clutch master and slaves cylinders, also tried different master cylinder sizes. I finally went to the K-Miata shop (at that time Dave's garage). After a lot of head scratching Dave said I have a clutch arm around here somewhere. Both looked perfect, but when we out them on a flat surface we could see they were different. My clutch fork was causing over extension of the clutch and that did make the clutch drag. So it's not crazy that over extension can cause clutch drag. Try engagement at various pedal travels and see what happens.

    Graham
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
    Posts
    170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lotusfan View Post
    Wayne,
    This is all a bit over my head so apologies if this is a stupid question. When you say pivot arm bolt is that the same thing as the clutch arm fulcrum pin which is attached to the bellhousing? Iíve seen a picture of the inside of the bellhousing and there is a washer behind this pin and I can appreciate how that would change the throw on the clutch arm. Iím interested in your solution on how to make it externally adjustable. Thanks.
    Yes, clutch arm fulcrum sounds like the proper term. It is really just a fancy bolt. The washer on the bolt stops it from going in to far and provides stability to the pin. If the threads go all the way through the bellhousing, the bolt can be stabilized and the length adjusted by using a stop nut on the exposed threaded portion. By filing a slot or square at the end of the bolt, its length can be changed without damaging the threads.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    17

    Default

    Had time to test whether it is an overextension problem causing the clutch to drag and it isn’t. Will start taking things apart tomorrow. Another question though, why would warming things up make the problem worse, ie when first started getting into reverse works ok, possibly without the clutch arm hitting the bell housing in it’s full extension. After the car is fully warmed up and taken a few trips up and down the driveway, reverse is much harder to get into, requiring the full travel of the clutch arm until it is hard up against the bellhousing and then getting reverse only with a bit of a grind.

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